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News


04/18/2017

Martin County will be participating in the statewide tornado drills at 1:45pm and 6:45pm on Thursday April 20th. All outdoor warning sirens will sound throughout the county. This is a great time to practice what you would do if there was a Tornado Warning.

Alerts & Warnings
How do you get your Alerts and Warnings? Thankfully we live in a technology age that allows us to have access to many different ways to receive alerts and warnings about severe weather. Here are some ways to make sure you stay informed of changing weather conditions:
CodeRED- this is a warning system use by Martin County to inform residents of changing weather and other types of emergency notifications. This is a voluntary sign-up system so if you wish to receive notifications visit our website, click on the Sheriff’s Office page and then click on the CodeRED icon.
CodeRED uses your location, an address you enter for your home, business or place of work. You can receive notifications by landline phone call, a phone call to your cell phone, a text message or an email.
Weather alerts through CodeRED are issued by the National Weather Service and CodeRED automatically sends them out.
A weather radio is also a great way to stay informed about changing weather conditions.
Your local radio and television stations do a great job of sharing weather information.
Have a smart phone? There are various app, including a CodeRED app that can be used to stay on top of developing severe weather conditions.
Do you know the difference between a Watch and a Warning?
A Watch means be prepared, severe weather is possible.
During a watch you should check forecast updates and know where to seek shelter.
A Warning means severe weather is imminent or happening and you should take shelter immediately.

Tuesday- Severe Weather, Lightning and Hail
Thunderstorms can produce straight-line winds that can exceed 120 mph, which is stronger and more destructive than most tornadoes.
On average, nearly 50 people die per year in the United States due to lightning and nearly four times as many men are killed as women.
There is NO safe place outside when it is lightning, if you can get inside a building that is the safest place to be.
Avoid open fields, the top of a hill or a ridge top.
Stay away from tall, isolated trees or other tall objects.
Stay away from water, wet items, and metal objects.
When you hear thunder head inside to a safe place!

Wednesday- Flooding and Flash Floods
Flooding kills more people annually than any other severe weather event.
75% of flash floods occur at night.
Half of all flood victims die in automobiles or other vehicles. Many deaths occur when people drive around barricades that clearly indicate the road is washed out ahead.
Driving Safety
6 inches of will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling
A foot of water will float many vehicles
Two feet of rushing water can carry away most vehicles including SUV’s and trucks
Do not drive through flooded roadways!
You will not be able to tell how much water is on the road, how fast the water is moving or what the road looks like under the water. Depending on how long or how fast the water has been rushing, the roadbed could be washed away.
Flash floods
Flash floods occur within 6 hours of the beginning of heavy rainfall.
Be prepared to evacuate and go to high ground immediately
Get out of areas subject to flooding, such as low spots, canyons, etc.
Do not attempt to cross a flowing stream on foot. Even water only 6 inches deep, when moving at a high rate of speed, can knock you off your feet.
Never drive through flooded areas or standing water.
If your vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately and see higher ground. Rapidly rising water may engulf the vehicle and its occupants.
Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.
Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly during threatening conditions.
Know the difference between a flash flood watch and a flash flood warning.
A watch means there is a potential for a flash flood.
A warning means a flash flood is imminent or happening.


Thursday- Tornadoes
Martin County will be participating in the statewide tornado drills at 1:45pm and 6:45pm on Thursday April 20th. All outdoor warning sirens will sound throughout the county. This is a great time to practice what you would do if there was a Tornado Warning.

In Martin County, the outdoor warning sirens are only sounded when a Tornado Warning is issued by the National Weather Service or when a trained spotter reports a tornado.
Outdoor warning sirens are not meant to be heard indoors, you should have another way of receiving alerts and warnings indoors.
There is no such thing as an “all clear” sound with the sirens; they will only go off if there is danger. From your safe place, you should have a way to monitor weather conditions to know when it is safe to return to your normal daily activities.

Friday- Extreme Heat
In Minnesota we experience all types of severe weather throughout the year so it’s no surprise we are at risk for experiencing extreme heat.
Never leave children, disabled adults, or pets in parked vehicles
Each year dozens of children and untold numbers of pets left in parked vehicles die from hyperthermia.
Tips for preventing heat related illness:
Drink plenty of fluids regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink.
Don’t drink liquids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar- these cause you to lose more body fluids. Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.
Stay indoors and, if possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library- even a few hours spent in air-conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat.
If you must be out in the heat:
Limit your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours
Cut down on exercise
Try to rest often, in shady areas
Protect yourself by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher. Alerts & Warnings
How do you get your Alerts and Warnings? Thankfully we live in a technology age that allows us to have access to many different ways to receive alerts and warnings about severe weather. Here are some ways to make sure you stay informed of changing weather conditions:

CodeRED- this is a warning system use by Martin County to inform residents of changing weather and other types of emergency notifications. This is a voluntary sign-up system so if you wish to receive notifications visit our website, click on the Sheriff’s Office page and then click on the CodeRED icon.

CodeRED uses your location, an address you enter for your home, business or place of work. You can receive notifications by landline phone call, a phone call to your cell phone, a text message or an email.

Weather alerts through CodeRED are issued by the National Weather Service and CodeRED automatically sends them out.

A weather radio is also a great way to stay informed about changing weather conditions.
Your local radio and television stations do a great job of sharing weather information.

Have a smart phone? There are various app, including a CodeRED app that can be used to stay on top of developing severe weather conditions.

Do you know the difference between a Watch and a Warning?
A Watch means be prepared, severe weather is possible.
During a watch you should check forecast updates and know where to seek shelter.
A Warning means severe weather is imminent or happening and you should take shelter immediately.

Tuesday- Severe Weather, Lightning and Hail
Thunderstorms can produce straight-line winds that can exceed 120 mph, which is stronger and more destructive than most tornadoes.
On average, nearly 50 people die per year in the United States due to lightning and nearly four times as many men are killed as women.
There is NO safe place outside when it is lightning, if you can get inside a building that is the safest place to be.
Avoid open fields, the top of a hill or a ridge top.
Stay away from tall, isolated trees or other tall objects.
Stay away from water, wet items, and metal objects.
When you hear thunder head inside to a safe place!

Wednesday- Flooding and Flash Floods
Flooding kills more people annually than any other severe weather event.
75% of flash floods occur at night.
Half of all flood victims die in automobiles or other vehicles. Many deaths occur when people drive around barricades that clearly indicate the road is washed out ahead.
Driving Safety
6 inches of will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling
A foot of water will float many vehicles
Two feet of rushing water can carry away most vehicles including SUV’s and trucks
Do not drive through flooded roadways!
You will not be able to tell how much water is on the road, how fast the water is moving or what the road looks like under the water. Depending on how long or how fast the water has been rushing, the roadbed could be washed away.
Flash floods
Flash floods occur within 6 hours of the beginning of heavy rainfall.
Be prepared to evacuate and go to high ground immediately
Get out of areas subject to flooding, such as low spots, canyons, etc.
Do not attempt to cross a flowing stream on foot. Even water only 6 inches deep, when moving at a high rate of speed, can knock you off your feet.
Never drive through flooded areas or standing water.
If your vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately and see higher ground. Rapidly rising water may engulf the vehicle and its occupants.
Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.
Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly during threatening conditions.
Know the difference between a flash flood watch and a flash flood warning.
A watch means there is a potential for a flash flood.
A warning means a flash flood is imminent or happening.


Thursday- Tornadoes
Martin County will be participating in the statewide tornado drills at 1:45pm and 6:45pm on Thursday April 20th. All outdoor warning sirens will sound throughout the county. This is a great time to practice what you would do if there was a Tornado Warning.
In Martin County, the outdoor warning sirens are only sounded when a Tornado Warning is issued by the National Weather Service or when a trained spotter reports a tornado.
Outdoor warning sirens are not meant to be heard indoors, you should have another way of receiving alerts and warnings indoors.
There is no such thing as an “all clear” sound with the sirens; they will only go off if there is danger. From your safe place, you should have a way to monitor weather conditions to know when it is safe to return to your normal daily activities.

Friday- Extreme Heat
In Minnesota we experience all types of severe weather throughout the year so it’s no surprise we are at risk for experiencing extreme heat.
Never leave children, disabled adults, or pets in parked vehicles
Each year dozens of children and untold numbers of pets left in parked vehicles die from hyperthermia.
Tips for preventing heat related illness:
Drink plenty of fluids regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink.
Don’t drink liquids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar- these cause you to lose more body fluids. Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.
Stay indoors and, if possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library- even a few hours spent in air-conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat.
If you must be out in the heat:
Limit your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours
Cut down on exercise
Try to rest often, in shady areas
Protect yourself by wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher.


ROD HALVORSEN
© 2015 KSUM KFMC


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